Government procurement arrangements

You must use a government procurement arrangement unless you have an exemption.
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What you need to know
  1. You must always use a whole-of-government contract where one exists unless you have an exemption.
  2. Sometimes you must also use a whole-of-government prequalification scheme.
  3. Where there isn’t a whole-of-government contract or scheme to use, you can piggyback on other agencies’ arrangements.
  4. You can use the existing whole-of-government contracts and prequalification schemes for procurements covered by PBD-2019-05 Enforceable Procurement Provisions.

Whole-of-government contracts and prequalification schemes

The general rule is that you must use a whole-of-government contract when one’s available to you. There are, however, some exemptions.

A whole-of-government contract appoints one or more suppliers to supply goods or services to any government agency, and runs for a specific period, usually 3 years. Some have 1- or 2-year extension options.

NSW Government arrangements can also include prequalification schemes which you can use to choose suppliers. Schemes do not generally include pricing information so you still need to confirm you are getting value for money when you use them.

View a current list of NSW Government contracts.

View a current list of NSW Government prequalification schemes.

Where no whole-of-government arrangement exists

Even where there’s no whole-of-government contract, you must check whether your agency or cluster is bound by any standing offers, panel contracts or other arrangements.

You should also check whether any agency- or cluster-specific pre-existing contracts, panels or prequalification schemes meet your needs.

If there are none, you may be able to use another agency’s contracts, panels or prequalification schemes through a piggybacking clause. This could help you access savings and volume discounts and tap into another agency’s best practice.

Read more about piggybacking through another agency’s contracts DOCX, 995.83 KB.

Whenever you carry out your own procurement, you must comply with:

NSW Government prequalification schemes

As well as using whole-of-government contracts, there are times you must also use a whole-of-government prequalification scheme.

Mandatory prequalification schemes are:

* You don’t have to use this scheme if you issue an open tender or engage a local contractor for a one-off contract less than $30,000. However, you must also invite that contractor to become prequalified.

Read PBD-2019-04 Approved procurement arrangements.

Read PBD-2013-01C Financial assessments.

Read PBD-2014-04C Constructions procurement prequalification schemes for work valued up to $1 million.

Choose to use a prequalification scheme

We encourage you to use prequalification schemes, even when you don’t have to.

Some of the key benefits of using prequalification schemes include:

  • getting access to a list of registered suppliers likely to be capable of performing the procurement
  • making it easier to conduct a streamlined and competitive tender process.

There are also advantages for suppliers, including a simplified application process, access to targeted opportunities and a reduced cost in doing business with government.

A prequalification scheme may cover a far-reaching scope of goods and services. However, suppliers will usually be authorised to supply only particular categories of goods and services within the scheme.

View a current list of NSW Government prequalification schemes.

Covered procurements

You can use existing whole-of-government contracts, procurement lists and prequalification schemes for procurements covered by PBD-2019-05 Enforceable Procurement Provisions.

You must make sure you comply with any rules for selecting and engaging suppliers under the contracts or schemes, to ensure you are compliant with the direction.

Read more about covered procurements.

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